Sep 13, 2015
“Abandoned But Not Alone” – Speaker: John Langley
Series: (All)
Alone in a crowd ... image was intentionally softened and colors muted to all but the alone person.
"Abandoned But Not Alone"
By: John Langley
Scripture: Matthew 11:28-30
Kind of a funny thing to say! Really! We have more ways to connect with other humans than ever before. We have: Facebook, Twitter, FireChat, Linkedin, eHarmony, smart phones, computers, and YMCA’s. With all these avenues of interaction, I believe, less and less meaningful contact is being made. The avenues of communication have multiplied, but we find it more difficult to truly connect. If you are ever in a crowd and feel alone, or if you feel you just don’t have a good friend to sit and visit with, maybe our multi-connected society has failed you. Consider Jesus’ words this morning as we worship together. 28“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. 29Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. 30For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” Matthew 11:28-30
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  • Sep 13, 2015“Abandoned But Not Alone” – Speaker: John Langley
    Sep 13, 2015
    “Abandoned But Not Alone” – Speaker: John Langley
    Series: (All)
    Alone in a crowd ... image was intentionally softened and colors muted to all but the alone person.
    "Abandoned But Not Alone"
    By: John Langley
    Scripture: Matthew 11:28-30
    Kind of a funny thing to say! Really! We have more ways to connect with other humans than ever before. We have: Facebook, Twitter, FireChat, Linkedin, eHarmony, smart phones, computers, and YMCA’s. With all these avenues of interaction, I believe, less and less meaningful contact is being made. The avenues of communication have multiplied, but we find it more difficult to truly connect. If you are ever in a crowd and feel alone, or if you feel you just don’t have a good friend to sit and visit with, maybe our multi-connected society has failed you. Consider Jesus’ words this morning as we worship together. 28“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. 29Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. 30For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” Matthew 11:28-30
  • Sep 6, 2015“Covenant” – Speaker: Patrick Barber
    Sep 6, 2015
    “Covenant” – Speaker: Patrick Barber
    Series: (All)
    Covenant
    "Covenant"
    By: Patrick Barber
    Welcome to East Point this morning! Meeting together to encourage each other and worship the Lord is the best way to begin the week. We know that God expects his family to come together like this, and he means for it to be something we look forward to doing every Sunday. Today is special in that we are focusing specifically on the Lord's Supper. We often call this Communion. Some, the breaking of bread. Still others call it the Eucharist--which simply means giving thanks. No matter what we call it, it is a sacred time that we share together. As we worship and commune this morning, let's remember all that God and his Christ has done for us. If we think of these things, our praise will be loud, our hearts will be touched, and we will leave this place closer to God than when we arrived. And then, with God's grace, we'll live in ways that show the world around us that Jesus, indeed, is alive.
  • Sep 6, 2015“Celebration” – Speaker: Patrick Barber
    Sep 6, 2015
    “Celebration” – Speaker: Patrick Barber
    Series: (All)
    Celebration
    "Celebration"
    By: Patrick Barber
    Welcome to East Point this morning! Meeting together to encourage each other and worship the Lord is the best way to begin the week. We know that God expects his family to come together like this, and he means for it to be something we look forward to doing every Sunday. Today is special in that we are focusing specifically on the Lord's Supper. We often call this Communion. Some, the breaking of bread. Still others call it the Eucharist--which simply means giving thanks. No matter what we call it, it is a sacred time that we share together. As we worship and commune this morning, let's remember all that God and his Christ has done for us. If we think of these things, our praise will be loud, our hearts will be touched, and we will leave this place closer to God than when we arrived. And then, with God's grace, we'll live in ways that show the world around us that Jesus, indeed, is alive.
  • Sep 6, 2015“Remembrance” – Speaker: Patrick Barber
    Sep 6, 2015
    “Remembrance” – Speaker: Patrick Barber
    Series: (All)
    Remembrance
    "Remembrance"
    By" Patrick Barber
    Welcome to East Point this morning! Meeting together to encourage each other and worship the Lord is the best way to begin the week. We know that God expects his family to come together like this, and he means for it to be something we look forward to doing every Sunday. Today is special in that we are focusing specifically on the Lord's Supper. We often call this Communion. Some, the breaking of bread. Still others call it the Eucharist--which simply means giving thanks. No matter what we call it, it is a sacred time that we share together. As we worship and commune this morning, let's remember all that God and his Christ has done for us. If we think of these things, our praise will be loud, our hearts will be touched, and we will leave this place closer to God than when we arrived. And then, with God's grace, we'll live in ways that show the world around us that Jesus, indeed, is alive.
  • Sep 6, 2015“Promise” – Speaker: Patrick Barber
    Sep 6, 2015
    “Promise” – Speaker: Patrick Barber
    Series: (All)
     Promise
    "Promise"
    By: Patrick Barber
    Welcome to East Point this morning! Meeting together to encourage each other and worship the Lord is the best way to begin the week. We know that God expects his family to come together like this, and he means for it to be something we look forward to doing every Sunday. Today is special in that we are focusing specifically on the Lord's Supper. We often call this Communion. Some, the breaking of bread. Still others call it the Eucharist--which simply means giving thanks. No matter what we call it, it is a sacred time that we share together. As we worship and commune this morning, let's remember all that God and his Christ has done for us. If we think of these things, our praise will be loud, our hearts will be touched, and we will leave this place closer to God than when we arrived. And then, with God's grace, we'll live in ways that show the world around us that Jesus, indeed, is alive.
  • Aug 30, 2015“God Don’t Shoot Craps”
    Aug 30, 2015
    “God Don’t Shoot Craps”
    Series: (All)
    8.30.2015
    "God Don't Shoot Craps"
    By: Patrick Barber
    Scripture: Psalm 146
    Today is the final Sunday of our short four-week series on selected parables of Jesus. Since it is the "end" of this series, it makes sense for us to talk today about what Jesus said about "The End." I'll do that during the sermon time. In case you've missed any of the last few weeks, here is a snapshot of what we've talked about during this series so far: (Matthew 21:33-46, The Parable of the Tenants) If we're not focused on the mission of the Kingdom that God gave us, we can lose our place and role in it. (Matthew 13:1-23, The Parable of the Sower) Many things can harden our hearts and cause us to be unproductive in the Kingdom of God, but if our hearts are pure God will make us fruitful. (Matthew 13:44-46, Two Parables of the Kingdom) If we believe in Jesus, then we must believe what he says, and he says that finding our way into the Kingdom is more valuable than everything else we can possibly have. If you want to hear about these in more depth, you can find these and our other sermons online at www.epcofc.org.
  • Aug 23, 2015“Best Day Ever” – Speaker: Patrick Barber
    Aug 23, 2015
    “Best Day Ever” – Speaker: Patrick Barber
    Series: (All)
    8.23.2015
    "Best Day Ever"
    By: Patrick Barber
    Scripture: Hebrews 12:18-29
    We have such an abundance of riches in America that it might be hard to answer this question, but let's try: What was your best day ever?  Some of us have lived long enough that it might be hard to pick one moment or one day that stands out above all the rest. Getting married? Having kids? Landing your dream job? Getting that first kiss?  Watching the Chiefs win a Super Bowl (well, there's always this year, right?) No matter what the event was that gave you the greatest joy in your life, the point is that we've all had some incredible moments. But none of them--and I can say that with certainty--are as valuable and as full of potential for joy as when God opens the doors of his kingdom to us. Life in the kingdom of heaven is unlike any other path we can take. It isn't the easiest path or the most glorious in the eyes of the world. But it is the best. Jesus said as much, and we're going to talk about the implications of that this morning! I'm glad you're here.
  • Aug 16, 2015“What Makes Your Garden Grow?” – By: Patrick Barber
    Aug 16, 2015
    “What Makes Your Garden Grow?” – By: Patrick Barber
    Series: (All)
    8.16.2015
    "What Makes Your Garden Grow?"
    By: Patrick Barber
    Scripture: Matthew 13:10-17
    We have a lot of great gardeners at East Point, but I'm not one of them.  I've tried to grow vegetables, but I clearly don't know what I'm doing.  You'd think it wouldn't be that hard.  I always thought you just needed dirt, seed, water, and sunlight and--boom--instant veggies.  Apparently not. So if you want vegetables, don't ask me.  We are starting an awesome community garden here at East Point, but have no fear, I'm not the one in charge of that project.  But that's a story for another day.  I just brought up all this garden stuff because today we're talking about a parable of Jesus that gardeners would really dig.  It's found in Matthew 13, and it teaches us something critical about our lives, our faith, and our future.  Unlike some passages in Scripture, this parable has something that applies to every one of us, so I'm glad you're here, and I hope you have ears to hear the word of the Lord.
  • Aug 9, 2015“Watch and Learn” – By: Patrick Barber
    Aug 9, 2015
    “Watch and Learn” – By: Patrick Barber
    Series: (All)
    8.9.2015
    "Watch and Learn"
    By: Patrick Barber
    Scripture: Isaiah 5:1-7
    I am the firstborn in my family and have one younger sister. Being the firstborn has some privileges, but it also means that you have to figure out a lot for yourself. I mean, who knew that I wasn't supposed to turn the dryer on with my little sister in it? I never heard my parents tell someone not to do that. Or who knew that magic markers weren't intended for the walls of my bedroom? It looked good to me at the time. But life was a little different for my sister. There were a few things she learned just by watching me and then paying attention to the reaction of my parents. Not surprisingly though, she would end up making some of the same mistakes I made along the way. That's just the way we are. Even when we see where others have gone wrong, we so often do the same thing. It isn't smart, but it's common. We've all been there before. At some point we really need to grow out of that. Magic marker can be painted over. Dryer doors get kicked open. Our role as servants and missionaries in God's kingdom, however, can be lost at horrific cost. We see in Scripture how ancient Israel forgot that it's privileged election meant that it had a special mission to be God's blessing to all the world. Jesus told his own people that their lack of faithful ministry meant that they would lose their position in the kingdom, and God would find others who would be faithful servants. And here we are as the younger siblings in that story. Have we really learned anything, or are we making the same mistakes all over again?
  • Aug 2, 2015“Live By Faith” – By: Patrick Barber
    Aug 2, 2015
    “Live By Faith” – By: Patrick Barber
    Series: (All)
    8.2.2015
    "Live By Faith"
    By: Patrick Barber
    Scripture: Romans 1:16-17
    “Faith” is such a frequent and prominent word in Scripture that you’d expect all believers to readily agree what it means, but if you read much in the way of Christian literature or listen to many different preachers you’ll find that the meaning of “faith” isn’t as neat and tidy as we might think. Those whom God inspired to write the collected writings that we call the Bible frequently used the word “faith,” but they didn’t always use it with the same meaning in mind, and they never made an attempt to fully define the word for us. Hebrews 11 begins with, “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.” Even that, however, is more description than definition. Part of our challenge is that “faith” is a word with many nuances. Does it mean “belief?” Yes. Well, I thought it meant “trust?” Sure, it means that, too. And what about obedience and action? Aren’t those concepts wrapped up in the biblical meaning of faith? Sure they are. Faith isn’t just something that we think, and it’s not merely something we feel. Faith is also something we do. This morning, we’ll look at a well-known Old Testament story that demonstrates what full faith is. Then, with God’s help, I hope we’ll choose to live every day in ways that reveal faith to the world around us.